Genealogy and the Telephone Game

When you were in school, did you ever play the game “Telephone” in which one person whispers a message to another, which is passed through a line of people until the last player announces the message to the entire group?

Genealogy can be a lot like that. Tonight I found this on Ancestry.Com.

ohshoor originally shared this

03 Sep 2012

Edward Marshbourne Jr. is likely the stepson of Elizabeth Nash Marshbourne Lloyd. After the death of Edward Marshbourne Sr., Elizabeth married Edward Lloyd, proprietor of Lloyd’s Coffee House, later Lloyd’s of London, an insurance underwriting consortium. Edward is reputed to have been involved in the publication of a broadsheet critical of Members of Parliament favored by the Crown and hustled onto a ship bound for the colony of North Carolina, where he may have established a school at Sarum, near New Hanover County. Edward Hilder of London, England, a genealogy researcher produced a series of three reports in the 1980’s or 1990’s which established Edward Jr’s. birth and christening and the marriage of Edward and Elizabeth Nash at St. Dunstan’s in the West, London. Edward Jr. was an ardent anti-Quaker and the broadsheet mentioned above expressed those sentiments. Later, Edward wrote a letter to the his benefactor in which he detailed his activities to date.

Here is my response:

Sep 11, 2015

I do not know if you got your notes of Edward Mashburn though my website (mashburngenealogy.com) directly or if it was filtered through several layers of researchers, but I take issue with the following statements:

“Edward is reputed to have been involved in the publication of a broadsheet critical of Members of Parliament favored by the Crown . . . “

“Reputed” means that someone made a statement about someone which they believe to be fact. I made a speculation that since Edward Mashborne left England about the time Edward Lloyd was reprimanded for his newsletter, the two events “may” have been connected. The above statement gives the wrong impression of the weight of the evidence and turns a speculation into a belief that someone held.

” . . .and hustled onto a ship bound for the colony of North Carolina . . .”

That is certainly taking poetic license. There is absolutely no evidence that Edward Mashborne was “hustled” away at all.

“Edward Jr. was an ardent anti-Quaker and the broadsheet mentioned above expressed those sentiments.”

We assume that Edward Mashburne was anti-Quaker since he was aiding Rev. Giles Rainsford and one of the purposes of Rainsford coming to North Carolina was to stop the spread of the Friends. But Edward’s religious belief concerning the Quakers can only be an assumption. The above statement gives the impression that Mashorne’s anti-Quakerism is a hard fact — it is not.

“Later, Edward wrote a letter to the his benefactor in which he detailed his activities to date.”

Absolutely not true. The letter Mashborne that wrote was to the Propagation of the Gospel was an appeal for financial aid. Since the SPG never sent Mashborne any aid (despite the support of the Bishop of London), one can hardly call the SPG “his benefactors.”

Thank you.
Steve Mashburn

ANOTHER ONE

edsonno4 originally shared this

30 Oct 2013

In 1711, the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel established an Anglican school for Chowanoke and local Native Americans at Sarum, with Mr. Marshburn as the teacher.

NO . . no . . no. The SPG did NOT establish a school with Mashborne as the teacher – the school was started and maintained by Mashborne without any SPG support. Although Mashborne expressed a willingness to teach Indian children, there is no proof that any Indian ever actually attended his school.

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